Ensuring SIP is enabled

It has been reported that some of the new MacBook Pros (Late 2016) have been shipping with System Integrity Protection (SIP) disabled. Apple has addressed this with the 10.12.2 update release. You can read about SIP on Rich Trouton’s blog.

There is one obvious question that comes to mind, do you trust the computers have not been compromised in shipping, especially with SIP disabled? Perhaps SIP doesn’t play as much into this question if your organization works off the assumption that you cannot trust any bits that come on the drive on new computers and they must all be wiped. After all, if someone intercepts a computer during shipping, it would be just as easy for them to disable and re-enable SIP as needed.

One thing to note here is that if you wipe and image new computers, that alone won’t re-enable SIP as that information is stored in memory. If you don’t wipe and image and instead rely on something like DEP or another no-imaging workflow, you still need to report on SIP’s status and somehow take action against computers that have it disabled to re-enable SIP.

Two ways of re-enabling SIP that come to mind: 1) boot into the Recovery Partition and re-enable SIP and 2) reset the NVRAM. The first you cannot really automate much short of asking allĀ  techs to reset PRAM on every computer coming in. The second can be done manually or via the command line. Our interest will be in doing this via the command line in order to automate this.

Continue reading Ensuring SIP is enabled

Advertisements